...
Assistance needed to pass ITIL Practitioner
Derrick 26 Aug 2016 16:03
I recently took the ITIL Practitioner course and two weeks later wrote the exam. To my surprise I did not do well. I'm not sure if it is because of the trainers lack to demonstrate the information practically or if it was just because it was a rehash of the training material. Alternatively, it could be my lack of understanding or how applied my thinking in the exam.

That being said, I'm hoping I can get some assistance from the community as to how and what one needs to do in order to pass the exam, especially if you know the material well. Is there any specific areas I should focus on or is there a specific way I should address this exam. Any assistance, would be highly appreciated.

Regards,
Derrick
 
Post Options
...
29 Aug 2016 15:11
Hi Derrick, I know how you feel :-(
I did not go to any official classroom course, I took on-line course from Pultorak, bought the Practitioner book and 2 vouchers for the exam. One in May, one few days ago. Both times I failed with 60%. I have plenty of experience in IT (over 15 years) and in service management (4 years). In my opinion, questions are too vaguely explained and misleading. Also, I took EXIN anywhere exam so I can't see which questions I failed (basically, you can, for a fee of 60 EUR and a trip expense to Holland). Having that in mind, I'll go back to the book, study some more and try again. Bottom line is that you need to "switch" your thinking into ITIL Practitioner mode, which is obviously, harder than passing ITIL intermediate exams as some people say.

Regards,
Damir
Post Options
...
29 Aug 2016 15:11
Hi Derrick, I know how you feel :-(
I did not go to any official classroom course, I took on-line course from Pultorak, bought the Practitioner book and 2 vouchers for the exam. One in May, one few days ago. Both times I failed with 60%. I have plenty of experience in IT (over 15 years) and in service management (4 years). In my opinion, questions are too vaguely explained and misleading. Also, I took EXIN anywhere exam so I can't see which questions I failed (basically, you can, for a fee of 60 EUR and a trip expense to Holland). Having that in mind, I'll go back to the book, study some more and try again. Bottom line is that you need to "switch" your thinking into ITIL Practitioner mode, which is obviously, harder than passing ITIL intermediate exams as some people say.

Regards,
Damir
Post Options
...
29 Aug 2016 18:34 Edited on 30 Aug 2016 at 09:28
Hi, I hope this helps. I'll write more generic stuff on taking the exam itself, then studying/preparing for it and finally some specifics. Disclaimer: It's my personal view from my own experience. I tried hard not writing ambiguous stuff. My goal is to help you on getting the certification because you're prepared for it :)

The exam is harder (in part because it is different in style and scope) than ITIL exams below ITIL Expert level. It combines relatively large topic coverage with template based questions and the specific scenarios (that you only get to read when you seat the exam) consume precious time. "It is what it is", like it or not. So reserve the time to study (with more than one pass through all the content please) and have a good night rest the day before the exam. 

The exam itself:
- You need to know really well the ITIL Practitioner book and where topics are. I think it's a good idea to use little post its to help find the chapters. Use the initial index and the word index at the end, it's good and faster than yor memory. It works. Some topics are touched in more than one place like stakeholder analysis or reporting (these are just examples; there's naturally lots of cross-referencing between the main topics like OCM with communication for instance). So it's more efficient wasting as little time as possible looking for context in the book.
- I find one or two questions really difficult to understand. So don't dwell too much on those. Tough decision because of the way the exam is organized (specific scenarios give context and at least for me it was hard coming back to a different block without re-reading the scenario again). I establish a half-way goal (like half the questions at half time or a bit earlier for buffer). I tend to be faster and review as little as possible but this time I reviewed a lot! So, make the time for it. 
- It takes time to read the specific scenario, the question, then think on the right answer and/or eliminate the wrong ones. So it's not efficient jumping around the questions; it's more effective doing them by specific scenario blocks of questions.

The study (more general - specific tips after this):
- I recommend reading all the ITIL Practitioner book in one go first so you know what's harder for you. Use different ways to review the content. For me it worked writing summaries, lists and to a lesser extent mindmaps. Writing it down makes me notice patterns and think on it in a different way (good because my memory is bad ;) I've used as a rule of thumb the weight of the questions per main topic as a guidance on how long I've studied for each (I studied first the heavy ones - did not follow exactly the book sequence for deeper study.
- Study really well the Introduction of the book; most of the easier questions come from here (it's really good and has new stuff there. I like the way the Service definition is deconstructed in value, outcome, cost and risk as a way of explaining waht a service is), you can thank me after passing the exam for this one.
- Try the mock exams officially available, they do reflect the kind of questions in the real exam. 
- Go beyond the questions available within the mock exams. Especially the ones using the templates at the end of the book. You will certainly have questions where practical examples regarding the usage of those templates are given and the question will be made on top of those.

The study - Specific tips (please take them with salt; it's my perception of my exam):
- For me measurement and metrics... The questions on this main topic used frequently templates from the appendix. So it's good to review the specific templates and mock exam questions using templates.
- For CSI Approach you'll have to be careful with outputs from each step (it really shows on the mock exam - I stress this again: study the mock exams), 
- As for the guiding principles, I suggest you take note whenever you find references of one or more of them on the other chapters; it does not show up always in a clear way in the book.
- Beware of the deceptive communication chapter. It's quite easy to understand while reading it but I found the questions hard. That being said maybe it's just the case this is the part I need to learn and practice the most ;) [I've been doing that by the way]

Hum. I hope this addresses your question Derrick! 

Até já
Rui
Post Options
...
31 Aug 2016 09:14
Hi Rui,

Thank you very much for the detailed information, highly appreciated.

When prepararing my studies, I read through the entire book and made mind maps of each chapter, but I guess where I really struggled was in the areas where the questions were vague and in my mind did not give enough information pertaining to the scenario. But that being said, I have to try again and take your advice and go through each chapter again, especially the introduction section, which I must admit I just browsed through this section. I think I also got caught out on the CSI approach. If memory serves me correct many questions were based on the outputs of each step and not the step itself. I will review the templates again and focus on the appendix as well as the mock exams.

Do you know where I could get additional mock exams for practise pruposes?

Thanks
Derrick
 
Post Options
...
01 Sep 2016 13:43 Edited on 01 Sep 2016 at 13:44
Hi Derrick, the best place for sample exams is at AXELOS!
https://www.axelos.com/certifications/sample-papers
They are up to date and reflect the real thing. Currently (1st of September), I am not aware of other sources. And this one is reliable - it reflects the real thing.

Yes, CSI Approach needs careful attention; beyond outputs, checking cross-references with other chapters/areas of ITIL Practitioner book and references to templates in the toolkit section (BTW, this works with most other chapters too)

It's a difficult exam. Knowing the book well helps because that way you'll have more time to read and double-check on the specific snecarios during the exam and to think on them. Reserve the time for study so you maximize your result.

Good luck! [And make sure you don't need luck ;) ]

Até já
Rui
Post Options
...
01 Sep 2016 14:00
Hi Rui,

I agree with you in all areas, I did follow similar approach as you described but I failed twice with 60%. Odd thing is I had exactly the same score report both times. In other words, I failed exactly the same questions (number of them) even if the exams were totally different. Maybe I am "overthinking" the answers, who knows. BTW, there is (was, I am not sure if it still exists) another mock exam at www.exin.com

Regards,

Damir
Post Options
...
02 Sep 2016 15:00
Thanks Rui, I will definitely the axelos sample papers. i will attempt the exam again and let you know the outcome.
Post Options
...
22 Sep 2016 15:39
Hi, I've written a post on this topic on my own blog (in my view, that can help wider awareness on the exam) and added a comment regarding global versus specific scenarios (the latter are... specific to the exam you take, though they use asimilar approach as the specific scenarios in the official sample papers. The former is exactly what you get in the official sample papers).

https://itilblues.wordpress.com/2016/08/30/taking-the-itil-practitioner-exam-ins-and-outs/

Até já
Rui
Post Options
...
10 Jan 2017 02:08
Thanks for sharing Rui !
Post Options
1 2 >
Forum Leaderboard
Our “Leaderboards” are just one way we show off the best and brightest of the AXELOS Community. This is a list of our top users with the highest post counts in the AXELOS Community - select "View the full leaderboard" to find out where you are on the list!