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ITIL 4 Managing Professional in 1,000 Words

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ITIL 4 Managing Professional in 1,000 Words

White Paper

  • White Paper
  • IT Services
  • Roles
  • ITIL

Author  Axelos

February 18, 2020 |

 9 min read

  • White Paper
  • IT Services
  • Roles
  • ITIL

ITIL® Managing Professional builds on the content in ITIL 4 Foundation, to provide practical guidance for people who work in a wide variety of IT and digital roles. The Managing Professional (MP) stream provides practical and technical knowledge about how to run successful IT-enabled services, teams, and workflows.

Before you read the Managing Professional publications or study for the managing professional exams, it is important to understand some key concepts from ITIL 4 Foundation. These include:

  • the four dimensions of service management
  • the service value system
  • the guiding principles
  • the service value chain
  • the 34 ITIL management practices.

These concepts will not be described in detailed here, however, If you’re not familiar with them, you could read this article about ITIL 4 Foundation. Another option is to read the ITIL 4 Foundation publication, or take an ITIL 4 Foundation training course.

There are four Managing Professional publications:

  • ITIL 4 Specialist: Create, Deliver and Support
  • ITIL 4 Specialist: Drive Stakeholder Value
  • ITIL 4 Specialist: High-velocity IT
  • ITIL 4 Strategist: Direct, Plan and Improve.

ITIL Managing Professional also includes 34 management practice guides. These are not published as hardcopies, but are available as PDF files online at www.axelos.com/my-axelos/my-itil.

ITIL 4 Managing Professional, The Service Value System and the Service Value Chain

The ITIL service value system includes everything needed to create value in the form of services. It encourages you to think about how all the different system components can work together to help co-create value with service consumers.

Image shows the ITIL 4 Service Value System concept diagram


At the centre of the service value system is the service value chain. This describes six activities that work together to take incoming opportunities and demand and create corresponding value. The service provider uses these activities to create and manage products and services that enable value co-creation with service consumers.

Image shows the ITIL 4 Service Value Chain concept diagram


SERVICE VALUE STREAMS AND PRACTICES

Every service provider designs and executes value streams that start with demand and end with value co-creation. While there is only one service value chain, each organization may have many different value streams; they might be simple straight-line journeys through the value chain, or they may loop around the value chain in multiple iterations with feedback.

Practices describe something the service provider can do from the perspective of all four dimensions of service management. They are not just about process activities, they also describe the required organization and people, information and technology, and suppliers and partners.

Many practices contribute to each value stream and every practice can contribute to many value streams. Excellent service management combines appropriate practices in the value streams to enable value co-creation. For example, to modify a service, a value stream may include contributions from:

  • relationship management to understand the needs and expectations of customers and other stakeholders
  • service financial management to analyse the costs
  • risk management to understand the associated risks
  • portfolio management to review costs, benefits, risks, and alignment with the strategy, and to decide whether to proceed
  • business analysis to create detailed requirements for the modified service
  • service design to design the modified service
  • software development and management to create new software features required
  • infrastructure and platform management to provide supporting infrastructure
  • service validation and testing to ensure that all the new or changed components work together as expected to enable the required value creation
  • change enablement to ensure that the service changes happen as and when required
  • deployment management to move the new and changed components to the live environment
  • release management to make the new or changed features available to the users
  • continual improvement to ensure that lessons are learned and feedback is incorporated into future work.

Other practices may also contribute to this value stream depending on the service being modified and how the organization works. This includes project management, organizational change management, architecture management, service level management, and other practices.

Please note that the involvement of different practices does not imply increasing the number of people and handoffs involved in doing the work. It is quite possible for one person, or a small team, to carry out most or all of the work, using ideas from practices as required.

While the ITIL Managing Professional exams are structured around the publications, each syllabus and exam also covers aspects of specific practices relevant to that publication.

ITIL 4 Specialist: Create, Deliver and Support

ITIL 4 Specialist: Create, Deliver and Support publication focusses on Design and transition, Obtain/build, and Deliver and support activities of the service value chain.

The publication provides guidance relevant to all four dimensions of service management. For example, advice on how to create a collaborative culture, use of tools and information to create deliver and support services, how to create and improve value streams to create, deliver, and support services, and how service integration and management can help to ensure that suppliers contribute appropriately to value creation.

Image shows the ITIL 4 Specialist concept diagram focusing on  Create, Deliver and Support




The syllabus and exam for Create, Deliver and Support includes content from this publication and from the following practices:

  • service design
  • software development and management
  • deployment management
  • release management
  • service validation and testing
  • change enablement
  • service desk
  • incident management
  • problem management
  • knowledge management
  • service level management
  • monitoring and event management.

ITIL 4 Specialist: Drive Stakeholder Value

ITIL 4 Specialist: Drive Stakeholder Value publication focuses on the band of visibility between service providers and service consumers. This content is very new and includes all aspects of each organization that are visible to each other. The publication is structured around a customer journey that includes the following stages:

  • Explore: The service provider and service consumer think about their own needs and opportunities and identify the potential for a future service relationship.
  • Engage: The service provider and service consumer form a relationship and start to build trust.
  • Offer: The service consumer defines their requirements and the service provider shapes their service offering.
  • Agree: The parties enter into a service agreement with aligned expectations for how value will be co-created.
  • Onboard: The resources of the service provider and the service consumer are introduced to each other so that they can start working together. This can involve resources from any of the four dimensions of service management.
  • Co-create: The parties work together to co-create value.
  • Realize: Value creation is measured, reported, and continually improved.

Image shows the ITIL 4 Specialist concept diagram focusing on Driving stakeholder value

This customer journey includes understanding of both the service consumer and the service provider. From the service consumer perspective, it can be seen as a supplier journey. The user journey is also considered as this must be planned and designed as part of the overall customer journey.

The syllabus and exam for Drive Stakeholder Value includes content from this publication and from the following practices:

  • relationship management
  • service catalogue management
  • supplier management
  • service desk
  • business analysis
  • service request management
  • service level management
  • portfolio management

ITIL 4 Specialist: High-velocity IT

The ITIL 4 Specialist: High-velocity IT publication considers the whole of the ITIL service value chain from the perspective of a modern digital organization.

This publication describes desired behaviours in a high velocity organization, and shows how a wide range of principles, models, concepts, and techniques can contribute to the five High-velocity IT objectives:

  • Valuable investments: Strategically innovative and effective application of IT
  • Fast development: Quick realization and delivery of IT services and IT-related products
  • Resilient operations: Highly resilient IT services and IT-related products
  • Co-created value: Effective interactions between service provider and consumer
  • Assured conformance: To governance, risk and compliance (GRC) requirements.


Image shows the ITIL 4 Specialist concept diagram for High-velocity IT

The syllabus and exam for High Velocity IT includes content from this publication and from the following practices:

  • portfolio management
  • relationship management
  • architecture management
  • business analysis
  • deployment management
  • service validation and testing
  • software development and management
  • availability management
  • capacity and performance management
  • monitoring and event management
  • problem management
  • service continuity management
  • infrastructure and platform management
  • service design
  • service desk
  • information security management risk management.

ITIL 4 Strategist: Direct, Plan and Improve

The ITIL 4 Strategist: Direct, Plan and Improve publication describes the plan and improve activities of the service value chain, as well as some aspects of governance from the service value system.

This publication provides practical guidance on how to plan and develop a service value system based on the ideas in ITIL. It includes sections on:

  • strategy and direction
  • assessment and planning
  • measurement and reporting
  • continual improvement
  • organizational change management
  • developing a service value system.


Image shows the ITIL 4 Specialist concept diagram focusing on Direct , Plan and Improvement

The content is not just aimed at senior management as everyone is responsible for some aspects of directing, planning, and improving. This publication will help practitioners to identify their own scope of control in which they will make decisions and plan improvements.

The syllabus, and exam, for Direct, Plan and Improve includes content from this publication and from the following practices:

  • continual improvement
  • organizational change management.

Conclusion

ITIL 4 Foundation described the building blocks needed to create and manage modern IT services. Once these building blocks are understood, the ITIL 4 Managing Professional publications will provide practical guidance to help you make use of these ideas to design and improve products and services.

When combined with the ITIL practices and the Managing Professional training courses, these will give you the ability to create more value for yourself, the organization you work for, and the customers and users you co-create value with.


ITIL 4 Managing Professional in 1,000 Words White Paper